Driving Flows

Complex Systems exchange energy and information  with their surrounding contexts. These flows between system and context help structure the system.

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According to the second law of thermodynamics a system, left to its own devices, will eventually lose order: hot coffee poured into cold will dissipate its heat until all the coffee in the cup is of the same temperature; matter breaks down over time when exposed to the elements; and systems lose structure and differentiation. The same is not true for complex systems. They gain order, structure, and information.

This is because such systems, while operating as bounded 'wholes', are not entirely bounded. They remain open to the environment, and the environment, in some fashion, 'feeds' or 'drives' the system: providing energy that can be used by the system to build and retain structure.   Thus complex systems violate the second law of thermodynamics and, rather then tending towards disorder (entropy), they are pushed towards order (negentropy).


 


Photo Credit and Caption: Driven by Flows

Cite this page:

Wohl, S. (2019, 13 November). Driving Flows. Retrieved from https://kapalicarsi.wittmeyer.io/taxonomy/driving-flows

Driving Flows was updated November 13th, 2019.

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  • There would be some thought experiments here.

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